infoneer-pulse

Course Post 16

infoneer-pulse:

“The American Academy of Pediatrics is unequivocal: If your kid is under 2, no screens. For older kids, two hours a day, max. But the AAP doesn’t differentiate between activities; education apps, base-jumping videos, first-person shooters, ebooks, Sesame Street, and The Shining are all thrown into the same bucket. It’s all just screen time. Trouble is, they’re not all the same. An app that teaches your kid his ABCs isn’t the same as a television cartoon, but the AAP is probably right to be conservative with its advice. “Researchers know almost nothing about the impact of touchscreen technology on young children,” says Heather Kirkorian, an assistant professor of human development and family studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who is trying to find some answers. “Our society is running a large-scale experiment with real children in the real world, and we won’t know the impact, if any, for many years to come.””

Are Touchscreens Melting Your Kid’s Brain? | Gadget Lab | WIRED

This article again, relates to my Scalar and here is the link http://www.wired.com/2014/04/children-and-touch-screens/

The above article in the link was written by Mat Honan.

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above image from: http://www.wired.com/2014/04/children-and-touch-screens/

This article is mostly about early parenting actually hence, “The tablet is the new pacifier” (Honan).

However this guy has a serious point. The kids running around using the technology we use will undeniably end up living in a different world than what we live in now, but how much of it will derive from instant information and entertainment we can carry around at a decent price and weighing less than a pound. He says, “But these screens have a weird dual nature: They make us more connected and more isolated at the same time. When I hand my daughter an iPad with an interactive reading app, she dives in and reads along. But she also goes into a trance. It’s disturbing because, frankly, it reminds me of myself” (Honan).

When i read that, what i hear is that the child seems more adult-like and simultaneously he seems more child-like. I think technology has leveled more than one plane. I think we can attribute technology to both higher IQ’s and lower IQ’s. I think we can go over the positives and negatives of technology incorporation into education and other institutions for hours. We can name things as more accessible, cheaper maybe, and then name them as less effective and flawed, but i think there is something that levels the plane regardless of intellect or age and i think that is the mentality that people have gained and are passing down. That is the leveling plane in my opinion.

I’m not sure if the mentality of everything be accessible and instant is a good thing or a bad thing, but i do think this article specifically demonstrates this. He is examining his kid and seeing himself. The kid finds all this as a normalcy while people my age and older have seen the instant everything trend from the beginning but we are all consumers of it.

The article quotes Heather Kirkorian saying, “Our society is running a large-scale experiment with real children in the real world, and we won’t know the impact, if any, for many years to come” (Honan). Honestly, in my opinion i wouldn’t say the kids are the only ones we should be focusing on because that would exclude adults that exhibit the same characteristics like the way the writer, Honan, noticed. I think the thing we need to be focusing on is how we use technology and by we i mean all of us. Technology always has a place, but it shouldn’t dominate us to the point of mental deterioration or halt the process.

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above image from: http://blog.cases.com/should-you-buy-your-child-a-tablet

fastcompany

Course Post 15 What Will happen to the Buildings

fastcompany:

"Knocking down a concrete building usually takes brute force: Wrecking balls, huge excavators, or explosives rip apart walls while fire hoses spray water to keep the clouds of dust down. It’s an energy-intensive process, and after everything’s been torn apart, the concrete often ends up in a landfill or has to be trucked to a recycling facility. But a new concrete-erasing robot may eventually transform the messy business of demolition."

Read More> 

This is will my course post 15 and here is the link http://www.fastcoexist.com/3028697/this-concrete-eating-robot-can-recycle-an-entire-building-on-the-spot

The above article was written by Adele Peters.

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The above picture is from http://www.fastcoexist.com/3028697/this-concrete-eating-robot-can-recycle-an-entire-building-on-the-spot

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The above picture is from http://www.fastcoexist.com/3028697/this-concrete-eating-robot-can-recycle-an-entire-building-on-the-spot#2

The article is all about this new machine, “The ERO (short for “erosion”) robot uses water to disassemble concrete and then sucks all of the separate components—cement, sand, and aggregate—neatly into different packages for reuse” (Peters).

It’s actually pretty genius. The article is worth is read. How i am relating this to my Scalar is by proposing the notion that within the strictly online component scenario the buildings that were formerly used as universities will require some sort of action. Perhaps all old universities become world wide ruin porn or perhaps we re-purpose the building for something else. Perhaps some will need to be destroyed. Perhaps this machine can do it in an economy friendly manner.

This machine isn’t ready though. However i think it will be, “The design is just a concept for now, though Haciomeroglu plans to built it and is already in conversations with manufacturers” (Peters).

This creation almost seems to eliminate notions of building renovation instantly because the machine itself basically recycles. The designer, “Haciomeroglu envisions a new business model: When a building comes down, the demolition crew could set up a station nearby to turn the materials into new prefab building blocks, and then those could be sold directly to someone constructing a new building in the neighborhood” (Peters).

I’d say his plan is pretty solid. I think this product also affects plenty of other institutions that could be abandoned like libraries or book stores. I see these kinds of buildings being more numerous and taking over in the event that the trend of utilizing already developed land takes over. Honestly, I’m all for that plan. I think ruin porn has it’s place and same with allegedly haunted buildings, but in the end it is also useless. People are demolishing perfectly good land to build exactly what they want when there are plenty of old buildings around that have already affected the natural environment around them. If we can’t re-purpose them the way we want, this machine can eliminate the building from the already developed land and the new building can be rebuilt in its spot and can even be rebuilt  from it’s old materials.

I’d say this is pretty smart and i’m all for it.

fastcompany

Course Post 14 Brain Stimulation Stuff

fastcompany:

What Happens To Our Brains When We Exercise And How It Makes Us Happier

"Most of us are aware of what happens to the body when we exercise. We build more muscle or more stamina. We feel how daily activities like climbing stairs becomes easier if we exercise regularly. When it comes to our brain and mood though, the connection isn’t so clear."

Read More>

So, again, this is in relation to my Scalar project.

I found this article on brains. Here is the link: http://www.fastcompany.com/3025957/work-smart/what-happens-to-our-brains-when-we-exercise-and-how-it-makes-us-happier

The above article in link was written by Leo Widrich.

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picture from: http://www.fastcompany.com/3025957/work-smart/what-happens-to-our-brains-when-we-exercise-and-how-it-makes-us-happier

In relation to education and the growing trends of online component incorporation, people will become more sedimentary (or could become more sedimentary). There are already plenty of people pointing to office jobs and constant sitting as the reason America is fat(ter). This article is basically demonstrating exercise as necessary for productivity. 

He says, “If you start exercising, your brain recognizes this as a moment of stress. As your heart pressure increases, the brain thinks you are either fighting the enemy or fleeing from it. To protect yourself and your brain from stress, you release a protein called BDNF (Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor). This BDNF has a protective and also reparative element to your memory neurons and acts as a reset switch. That’s why we often feel so at ease and things are clear after exercising and eventually happy” (Widrich).

I’m not saying that online education will make us fat, but allowing education to be more convenient encourages people to stay at home, which encourages people to be more sedimentary, which enables laziness all while going green(ish). I’m simply proposing that getting out of your house and going to a physical university involves movement and movement of any kind is good and brain stimulating. Brain stimulation= a more productive person. 

I think making education online and out of the physical classroom is an imperfect mirror reflection of the office job we attribute to our alleged fat bodies.

I see these ideas as a criticism from fitness advocators in the event of online education becoming the standard.

But, it’s not like laziness of college kids doesn’t happen now.

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Picture from: http://www.savethestudent.org/timewasters/30-pics-of-the-laziest-students-ever-known.html

And sometimes, our laziness is fairly intelligent… or at least frugal.

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Picture from: http://www.savethestudent.org/timewasters/30-pics-of-the-laziest-students-ever-known.html

Click the picture links for more funny college kid pictures.

infoneer-pulse

Course Post 13 Issues with Online Information

infoneer-pulse:

“18% of online adults have had important personal information stolen such as their Social Security Number, credit card, or bank account information. That’s an increase from the 11% who reported personal information theft in July 2013. 21% of online adults said they had an email or social networking account compromised or taken over without their permission.The same number reported this experience in a July 2013 survey.”

More online Americans say they’ve experienced a personal data breach | Pew Research Center (via onaissues)

This post is also going to be relevant to my Scalar project on education.

Here is the link: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/04/14/more-online-americans-say-theyve-experienced-a-personal-data-breach/

This article talks about how online information is not perfectly untouchable. We live in a world where anything can be stolen, tampered with, or manipulated.

picture from: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/04/14/more-online-americans-say-theyve-experienced-a-personal-data-breach/

picture from: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/04/14/more-online-americans-say-theyve-experienced-a-personal-data-breach/

So what would this mean for online education and cheating? This picture above shows that main target of people whose identity has been stolen is mostly ages 30 to 64. I’m not saying someone is going to steal your degree that you earned online, no. I’m saying that people have figured out ways to take your entire identity by cheating the system, I’m sure there are people who are going to figure out a way to cheat their way through an online course. Certainly this depends on development of the course and the course’s components (like if it involves video involvement on the student’s end or at least one classroom meeting).

I can think of plenty of scenarios that could play out when an entire course is online and has no video or physical classroom meetings like having someone else take your quiz (or test or make a post or write your paper). So if education moves entirely online or involves a heavy online component, what will be the verification that the student is actually the student doing the work?

Students typically get a student id which is not near as sacred as your social security number, but in an online course with no classroom meetings someone else could log in as you. So what would be a scenario that rules out student impersonation being that the growing trend is either strictly online courses or heavy online components?

I honestly can only think of one and i think it still has issues, but making your social your student id could demonstrate that student impersonation is worthy of serious penalty within the institution. Let me try and defend why i think that could work. Giving out your social at all is a huge no no. So i would think if a student was thinking about giving someone their log in information to do the work for them, they would be less likely to do so with their social as their log in. If it’s a boyfriend/ girlfriend/ or even just a friend doing the work and things go bad well then technically they could take your money. On the other side, making your social as your log in might also raise criminal activity outside the online education system or more the online education system might be one of the easier ways to acquire someone’s social.

Perhaps i just proposed a mess.

Sure there is the notion that if you cheat and don’t get caught you are cheating yourself, but is there a way to enforce online education’s hole in possible student impersonation?

infoneer-pulse

Course Post 12 Population decrease

infoneer-pulse:

“To sum up: higher education has overbuilt capacity for a student demand which has started to wane. America has overshot its carrying capacity for college and university population, and our institutions are scrambling for strategic responses.”

Essay considers whether higher education in the U.S. has peaked | Inside Higher Ed

This is another post in relation to my Scalar project on education. I’m thinking this one will fall into the economics/ money page.

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2014/04/07/essay-considers-whether-higher-education-us-has-peaked#ixzz2z4vzDCce

The above article in link was written by Bryan Alexander.

This article examines why colleges are having trouble maintaining themselves, basically as a business. Enrollment is down which causes a myriad of problems for the university.

The article says, “While fewer Americans are now attending higher education, we also spend less on tuition and other costs. The recent recession and slow recovery obviously play a role here, as do the longer trends of stagnant family median income. Possibly some students have downshifted their institutional expectations in order to save costs, preferring a community college to more expensive state university, or online degrees to those from brick-and-mortar institutions. Staying close to home can save residence hall/apartment costs. For whichever reasons, tuition-dependent colleges and universities are suffering a decline in their main income stream. The majority of campus chief financial officers see serious sustainability issues unfolding” (Bryan Alexander).

It’s funny how the problem would seem to mainly be the lack of enrolling or the type of university we enroll in, until he makes an observation i would have never thought of.
He says, “Behind these economic and enrollment decisions lies an even greater force, the demographic decline of American children and teens. The number of minors, especially in the Northeast and Midwest, has been decreasing for several years. This has already impacted K-12 student populations, a fact well known to parents, school boards, and state planners. In turn such a shrinkage threatens to tighten the traditional-age undergraduate pipeline, which is already being squeezed by enrollment and financial support problems” (Bryan Alexander).

Is he really saying that the world is low on humans? I feel like we are always hearing this the other way around, like there isn’t enough room. So does that mean there are too many old people? Babies? People my parent’s age? So i decided to look.
Down below is a link showing the number of children in America compared to the number of adults and it is in fact, going down. Weird.
So demand is going down not entirely because people are choosing to opt of out typical four year universities, but because the headcount in America is lower.
Here is 2010.
fastcompany

Course Post 11

fastcompany:

This Bike Is Made From Wood And Recycled Soda Cans

"Could cycling get any better for the planet? This design concept imagines a far greener bike than the standard metal frames in use today." More> Co.Exist  

A part of me wishes i found this when we read Dunne and Raby because this is design and it is smart.

Here is the article:http://www.fastcoexist.com/3027716/this-bike-is-made-from-wood-and-recycled-soda-cans

The above article in the link was written by Adele Peters.

"Gestoso is currently working on building the prototype and making the frame more durable. ‘I’m planning to produce this bike some day, but for now it’s just a concept,’ he says" which basically is speculative design (Peters).

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image from: http://www.fastcoexist.com/3027716/this-bike-is-made-from-wood-and-recycled-soda-cans

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image from: http://www.fastcoexist.com/3027716/this-bike-is-made-from-wood-and-recycled-soda-cans

Basically i’m posting this because i want one. I want a wooden bike with the inclusion of recycled materials. This is like a better shade of going green. Bikes replace cars and car emissions and recycled materials replace the necessity of finding and using new materials.

The site also says, “If everyone in the U.S. living within five miles of work started commuting by bike only one day a week, it would save as much pollution as taking a million cars off the road for a year” (Peters).

I don’t think this is a product that will save the world, but it reeks of everything familiar, new, trendy, hipster, efficient, smart, and green. This product floods into plenty of audiences or markets, is extremely relevant and it’s concept could easily be built upon.

Case and point: i want one.

infoneer-pulse

Course Post 10

infoneer-pulse:

“Economists have noted how work hours for white collar, college-educated workers began to become extreme in about the 1980s, and at the same time, social surveys were picking up a heightened sense of economic insecurity in this same group. Some people say we’re working more because we want more stuff (like that stupid Cadillac commercial that made me so angry I wrote a piece about it). While it’s true that household debt and spending on “luxury” items have gone up at the same time, it’s also true that wages have been stagnating and the costs of basic things like health care, housing, and education have gone through the roof—the cost of college has blown up nearly 900 percent in recent decades. When was the last time anyone outside hedge fund managers and the 1 percent got a 900 percent raise? Against that backdrop comes technology and the ability to be connected 24/7 - which leads to a feeling of constantly being “on call,” that you can never quite get away from work, that the boundaries that used to keep work more contained have bled and spilled over into the hours of the day that used to be for family, for self, for leisure, for sleep.”

America’s Workers: Stressed Out, Overwhelmed, Totally Exhausted - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic

Even though this article speaks largely about parenting and motherhood, i’m not entirely sure there are many people that are unable to identify with these ideas.

This article was written by Rebecca Rosen for The Atlantic (online source link- http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/03/americas-workers-stressed-out-overwhelmed-totally-exhausted/284615/) i see in relation to my Scalar project on education but possibly in a different light.

Largely, as i’ve posted about before and as most know, the education system’s immediate future is moving towards online incorporation to the classroom or strictly online courses. One of the the things this article says is, “That’s when it hit mehow we sometimes create busyness in order to conform to this social ideal, that to be worthy is to be busy. I don’t say this to blame people. I do it, too. But the only way to change it, if we don’t like it, is to first be aware of it, be aware of our that urge to conform, to be worthy, to be enough, drives us sometimes unconsciously” (Rosen, The Atlantic).

Here is where i am going with this quotation and my interpretation. If education is moving in the direction that it seems to be, where an online course suggests that the student or user is managing their time to complete the courses, yet we are always busy is it really efficient to take so much of structure out of it?

The article again, as i said talks largely about parenting, motherhood, being a working mom, the responsibilities, the coping, the venting, possible issues, etc. but i think each person can make these complaints to an extent or in a different fashion with the same feelings. We do keep ourselves busy constantly so (if the scenario continued to the point that school is not entirely obsolete and online) would making school more convenient help the mess of our lives or hinder it more? There are times undoubtedly when your outside life needs more focus and time then your school, but if the course was online and at your convenience would it have the same level of completion as say, showing up to class without having read and still getting an attendance grade? Would school take the back burner because of its similarities to everything else in your life like work and social media indulgences.

I understand that education is evolving with the times, but it should be noted that the system that teaches intellect and academia, is both becoming harder and easier simultaneously, learning could take a big hit one way or the other. It becomes harder in the sense that you have even more responsibility than before, the necessity of being tech-savvy, possibly less easy grades (like attendance) and this could cause someone to fail simply because of lack of traditional structure. It becomes easier because it is convenient, cheaper and at the same time could be easier to pass as long as you are responsible.

What this seems to lead to is students with passing grades are not only intellectual, they are responsible as well. Students without passing grades might be below average, irresponsible or they very well might not be tech-savy.

If the systems switches completely over to this technological incorporation or strictly online, it seems that there is even more to learn to be able to learn.

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image from: http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/03/americas-workers-stressed-out-overwhelmed-totally-exhausted/284615/

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image from: http://evidencemag.com/multitasking-myth-podcast/

infoneer-pulse
Whether they work at a big research university, a small four-year college, or something in between, academic-library directors share a “resounding dedication” to teaching information literacy to undergraduates. Beyond that, the priorities they set for their libraries depend on the size and nature of their institutions and how many (or few) resources they have to work with.